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Monday, June 05, 2006

Comments

I Was There


It's disappointing that this coward doesn't address why he booed only at the last possible instant of the curtain call, a move designed to ensure he could avoid a conversation and do a "boo and run". It was only because Bill T. Jones was quick to react and the audience held this person accountable that he's even talking--his intention was clearly to skulk away in the first place, and that's what's reprehensible.

It's ironic that someone who has worked in anti-terrorism can't see what the piece was about, and sad that the only thing he looks for is beauty--he should stay home in the future with some Thomas Kincaid paintings of lillies and leave the dialogue to people with the guts and determination to stand up and actually express their views in an informed, engaged and open manner.

Ida

Your decision to comment anonymously is pretty ironic.

I spoke with a number of esteemed artists and arts administrators over the weekend; they seem to think his decision to appear at Avery was a stout call.

I Was There


The fact that he appeared at later events doesn't change the circumstances of the original incident, which were cowardly. If the audience hadn't fingered him he would have cut and run.

It is too bad that I'm posting anonymously, but I'm an artist at Spoleto this year and don't feel like becoming a gossip item in the Post and Courier.

walter biffle

I'm NOT an artist at this year's Spoleto and would love to be a gossip item in the P & C. Therefore, I gotta say:

First off, kudos for the person booing. It takes courage to do that. We need more people like that.

But next, like the anonymous artist here, i have to ask: How is an expectation to pay for "beautiful dancers perform[ing] beautiful dance" not highly political in itself?

Priviledge is political, lawyerman. (and we need fewer people like this).

Heather

I find it akin to paying for a concert and receiving a political rant. There are several musicians I no longer support, for this practice. I may share the same appreciation of music with an artist, but it does not necessarily translate to my sharing the same political view. Personally, I feel political lectures should be reserved for venues in which they are expected and open for debate. If a work of art was an obvious platform for a political rant, I would choose to spend my money elsewhere. If I wanted a sermon, I'd visit a church or call my mother.

Would I openly boo? No, I find that as distasteful the lecturing itself. I would leave as unobtrusively as possible.

Heather

Ignore me, I was unaware of Mr. Jones' political bent.

I was speaking of occasions where it is unexpected.

no fair

"I spoke with a number of esteemed artists and arts administrators over the weekend; they seem to think his decision to appear at Avery was a stout call."

Okay, but what do YOU think? ;)

I Was There

"How is an expectation to pay for "beautiful dancers perform[ing] beautiful dance" not highly political in itself?"

I think you don't really understand me, but yes, I agree--that expectation is political, and it's the expectation that since you hold a dominant belief you don't want any troublesome art making sound. It's the political belief that art should be seen and not heard...it's absolutely political.

And the booing took no courage. As I've said before, it was done just as the house lights were coming up, and if he hadn't been outed he'd have slunk away.

walter biffle

right on. i dig it.

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